Follow by Email

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

How are words made?



All our knowledge about how words are made is almost zero. We know only how words sound when we say them and how words look when we write them, nothing else, nothing more.

Let’s look more closely at one word you have already read on my previous articles. It is the word for the eye.

How words are contained in human minds in the beginning of the language creation?
I suppose the word for eye is one the first words created by humans. How did it happen? Was it just a mental image for the real thing eye before the word "eye" was created or a mental definition? It is very similar to the question we ask in our modern time for the "language" of animals. Do animals have in their brains the mental images of the actual things of the world?

If we experiment now with ourselves saying “eye” what will happen in our mind? Do you see any eye image after you thought, or said the word “eye”? I did it, and no eye image came in my mind, but I cannot conclude it was the same for the first word of primitive humans. I think that before the first word,  there was not created any abstract mental definition in human brain cells. For the first word the primitive humans  saved inside their brain cells for the first the image of an eye, which existed before but was not memorized in the brain cells  in full awareness. That moment human brain broke the border of the animal stage taking awareness and memorizing  the images of outside world. That moment happened before the creation of the sounds for that image. I think that the starting point of the language was not about idiotic sounds but about a very complected evaluation of human brain on how to memorize the outside world.

My detection is that the word eye comes primarily from its “o” shape.

Is my detection enough to give a complete answer about how was the word for “eye” made?

There are thousands of different words for the physical eye. The simplest linguistic concept of "eyes", such as those based on its “o” shape, does nothing but gives us the sufficient answer for the obvious relation between the written word and sound and the physical eye. Anyone can easily see the relationship between them. The “o” image of an eye founds the word. It comes from a physical characteristic of an eye.

Are there involved more complex linguistic “eyes” concepts?

It is clear that different people saw and pictured and sounded differently the connection between the physical eye and the word.

Are they more complex lines that run between a physical eye and its word?

If we discover other lines they would connect the physical eye and all sorts of its words in different languages.

There are approximately 6000 words for the eye in all languages of the world.

A list of some of them: sy, si, ach’k’, göz, begi, vačej, Cakṣu, oko, ull, mata, Yǎn, oog, silm, silmä, oeil, ollo, t’vali, Auge, etc:

Understanding
Languages
Eye word
?
Albanian

Sy (gheg),
Si (tosk)
?
Estonian
silm
?
Finish
silmä
?
Danish
eye
?
Chinese
Yǎn
?
Armenian
ach’k’
?
Gujarati
ankha
?
German
Auge
?
Basque
begi
?
Belarusian
vačej
?
Georgian
t’vali
?
Bengali
Cakṣu
O
Azerbaijani
göz
O
Bosnian
oko
O
Bulgarian
oko
O
Croatian
oko
O
Czech
oko
O
Latin
oculus
O
Italian
occhio
O
Dutch
oog
O
French
oeil
O
Galacian
ollo
O
Catalan
ull
?
Cebuano
mata
?
Filipino
mata
?
Greek
matí

We know that the eye is a vital organ of vision. It detects light from the environment, regulates its intensity to form the image of the external objects, converts the image into an electrical signal and transmits that signal to the brain. That is science.

We know also that it played a very important role in the human evolution. The human eye is the organ which gave our ancestors to learn more about the physical world, to see all external objects, their shapes, colors, which later somehow got a sound word.

We, modern humans use our eyes in almost every activity we do and make: working, driving, reading, or watching television.

No comments:

Post a Comment